Contributor Bios

James Altman serves as an Accessibility Resources Support Technologist for the Accessibility Resources Team (ART), Office of Accessibility Resources (OAR) at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Prior to joining the ART, he served a year as an Academic Support Specialist for the Academic Success Center (ASC) at UNLV, and spent a number of highly successful years teaching in the UNLV English Department. His research … Continue reading Contributor Bios

Review of Bright Signals: A History of Color Television

Review by James Altman Bright Signals: A History of Color Television. Susan Murray. Durham University Press, 2018. 308 pages. 978-0-8223-7170-0, pp. v-308. Susan Murray is a noted scholar of numerous aspects of American television culture and its impact on popular culture. In Bright Signals: A History of Color Television, she examines what she considers to be an understudied aspect of television history, the evolution of … Continue reading Review of Bright Signals: A History of Color Television

Review of The Lemonade Reader: Beyoncé, Black Feminism and Spirituality

Alexis Noel Brooks The Lemonade Reader: Beyoncé, Black Feminism and Spirituality. Edited by Kinitra D. Brooks and Kameelah L. Martin. Routledge, 2019. 260 pp. ISBN: 978-1138596788.   Beyoncé Knowles-Carter is a cultural phenomenon. Those who fail to use her lyrics, videos, and performances as texts miss an opportunity to take the pulse of American society. Since Beyoncé released her visual album, Lemonade (2016), many have … Continue reading Review of The Lemonade Reader: Beyoncé, Black Feminism and Spirituality

The Princess is a Whore

By Erin Fleet   ABSTRACT Sigmund Freud’s creation of the “Madonna-Whore” dichotomy has forever changed the way in which women are perceived in different forms of media and society as a whole. The three categories of the dichotomy are not necessarily wrong but are not categories at all; they are a journey that all women go through as they learn about their sexuality. While many … Continue reading The Princess is a Whore

Archetypal Development in One Body, One Image: Female Theatricality in Tennessee Williams’s “A Streetcar Named Desire”

By Raluca Comanelea   Abstract This literary scholarship aims to trace the archetypal development of the female lead character in “A Streetcar Named Desire” by Tennessee Williams: Blanche DuBois. This fascinating character assumes almost as many archetypal female roles throughout the play as the roles an actress might accept over the course of a long career. Blanche’s most important quality—her ability to seduce audiences into perceiving … Continue reading Archetypal Development in One Body, One Image: Female Theatricality in Tennessee Williams’s “A Streetcar Named Desire”

“But If It Dies, It Produces Many Seeds”: Ritual Sacrifice in the Film Midsommar and the Spanish Bullfight

By Danielle Meijer   Abstract What viewers tend to find most disturbing about Ari Aster’s 2019 film, Midsommar, is that the rural Swedish community at the heart of the narrative not only engages in violent ritual human and animal sacrifice, but does so joyfully. There is a parallel here with how many view Spanish bullfighting. How, outsiders ask in both instances, could a culture take … Continue reading “But If It Dies, It Produces Many Seeds”: Ritual Sacrifice in the Film Midsommar and the Spanish Bullfight

Octavia in Vegas: Teaching Octavia Butler in a Las Vegas Classroom

By Briana Whiteside   Abstract “Octavia in Vegas,” explores my experiences with teaching science fiction writer Octavia Butler in the English classroom. The article reveals the syllabus construction, student resistance and responses to Butler’s works, and how we interpreted her significance in popular culture. It also interrogates possible limitations of the course, such as how the material was taught and my teaching methods. Keywords: Octavia Butler, science … Continue reading Octavia in Vegas: Teaching Octavia Butler in a Las Vegas Classroom