Ambassador of Cajun Music: Jimmy C. Newman, 1927-2014

by Michael Green In February 1765, the first boat with French-speaking refugees from Acadia in Nova Scotia arrived in the present-day state of Louisiana, where their description of themselves as Acadians changed, just as regional dialects change, into Cajuns. Their departure was part of what one historian of Cajun culture calls an “ethnic cleansing.” The British had acquired French Canada two years before and deported … Continue reading Ambassador of Cajun Music: Jimmy C. Newman, 1927-2014

The X-Fantastic

By Daniel Ferreras Savoye Contrary to the common notion shared by authors and fans alike, the series The X-Files is much closer to the fantastic mode than to science fiction, for the narrative tension upon which most episodes rely is the result of the opposition between what can be accepted as possible and what defies our understanding of reality rather than of the defamiliarization created … Continue reading The X-Fantastic

Entertainment as Education: Multiculturalism and Interculturalism in Eytan Fox’s 2004 Film Walk on Water

By Erika Engstrom   ABSTRACT This article demonstrates how Israeli director Eytan Fox’s 2004 film Walk on Water (Lalechet Al Ha-Mayim) can be utilized to teach concepts of multiculturalism, interculturalism, and intercultural communication competence. A textual analysis of the film’s visual and dialogic content demonstrates how narrative and aesthetic elements, such as those in Walk on Water, provide viewers cognitively and emotionally provocative stories that … Continue reading Entertainment as Education: Multiculturalism and Interculturalism in Eytan Fox’s 2004 Film Walk on Water

Robert Eggers’ The Witch: A Feminist Folktale of Fear and Floating

By H. Peter Steeves   ABSTRACT The title card of Robert Eggers’ 2015 film, The Witch, tells us that what we are about to see is “A New England Folktale.” Moving from a critique of colonialism and capitalism to an analysis of identity politics and trans-philosophy, this essay reads Eggers’ film through a (mostly second-wave) feminist lens and argues that the folktale at work explains … Continue reading Robert Eggers’ The Witch: A Feminist Folktale of Fear and Floating

Police Body-Worn Cameras: We See What You See, But Is it Helping?

By Elenice DeSouza Oliveira and Reginia Judge   ABSTRACT Body-worn cameras (BWCs) are valued as useful recourses. They serve to increase police transparency and accountability, provide evidence of police-citizen interactions, and assist in police officer training. Conversely, BWC use creates grave concerns regarding privacy rights, mandatory use by police officers, and the availability of video footage to the public. It becomes clear that they are … Continue reading Police Body-Worn Cameras: We See What You See, But Is it Helping?

black and white photo of the band Metallica

“Sad But True”: Why Metallica’s Fans Continue to Fail Them (and Not Vice Versa) Twenty Years After the Napster Lawsuit

By Tracy Reilly   ABSTRACT Twenty years have elapsed since the Metallica v. Napster copyright lawsuit forever changed the landscape of digital file sharing and the fate of the music industry—as well as Metallica’s reputation that had become tarnished by fans who felt entitled to “free” music. By debunking collectivist ideologies and defending the long-standing principles of individuality and copyright ownership, this article reveals why … Continue reading “Sad But True”: Why Metallica’s Fans Continue to Fail Them (and Not Vice Versa) Twenty Years After the Napster Lawsuit

From the Editor’s Desk

As we begin a new decade, popular culture studies continue to illuminate the past and hopefully provide some guidance for what is to come. Peter Steeves’ brilliant analysis of “Robert Eggers’ The Witch: A Feminist Folktale of Fear and Floating” sees it as “a tale told by a culture—our culture that knows it has done something horrible, but can’t quite come to terms with it.” … Continue reading From the Editor’s Desk